Social Media Has Been Instrumental in the Gun Protest School Walkouts

March 16, 2018

By admin, creative at D'Marie

gun control

An estimated one million students participated in a gun control protest on March 14th, 2018- exactly one month after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Florida that left 17 students and faculty members dead. The entire school was traumatized by the incident, which was the most deadly school shooting since Columbine.

Students across the country organized school walk-outs that lasted exactly 17 minutes, one for each of the victims of the Florida shooting. Here’s a Snapchat map that shows a few of the organized protests:

gun control

Photo from Fast Company

Mike Murphy, a technology reporter at Quartz, tweeted that Snapchat “is where US kids, tomorrow’s voters, communicate today”. Snapchat has been instrumental in the organization of various pro gun control walkouts, communication about the issue, and relaying of news during the actual Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting.

Twitter has been the go-to place to voice opinions on issues as soon as they happen, which has helped recent social movements attract like-minded supporters of the cause, spread awareness to their followers, and become more involved in finding a solution.

Social media has been known to be extremely helpful in bringing people together to form communities, and has been a useful tool when it comes to speaking up about social issues, organizing rallies and protests around them, and demanding change. Twitter has been the go-to place to voice opinions on issues as soon as they happen, which has helped recent social movements attract like-minded supporters of the cause, spread awareness to their followers, and become more involved in finding a solution.

Recently we’ve seen this a lot when it comes to those seeking stricter gun control laws after the amount of school shootings has drastically increased, as well as the #MeToo movement demanding change and consequences when it comes to sexual harassment and assault. Without social media, these protests would not have been as organized and powerful as they have been, and we applaud those who decide to use social media to promote positive change.